California Code of Civil Procedure 1013 – Service by Mail

California Seal 1013
California Code of Civil Procedure 1013 concerns the issue of service by mail in a court action, and what constitutes as proof of service to the court. The proof options can be one of the following:

  • An affidavit with the exact title of the document served and filed, bearing the name and address, either home or business, of the serving individual, demonstrating they are a resident of the county in which the mailing occurred. (It is important to note that the affidavit must also state that he and or she is over 18 years old, and is not a party to the legal action, with the date and where the document was served in the mail. Proof that the envelope was sealed and deposited with postage paid in full must also be made evident.)
  • A certificate with the exact title of the document served and filed, including the name and business address of the server, showing that he or she is admitted to the State Bar of California, and not a party to the legal action. (As with the affidavit, this certificate must show the date and place where the mail was deposited and the name and address of the individual being served on the envelope, with proof the envelope was sealed and deposited in the mail with postage prepaid in full.)
  • An affidavit with the exact title of the document being served in the action, with the name and address of the individual serving, that he or she is a resident or is employed in the county where the service takes place.

(Note that if a clerk of court completes the service task, the code requires a certificate by that clerk with the exact title of the document served, the name of the clerk who performed the service, and a statement that he or she is a clerk of the court and not party to the cause is required.)

This code also states that these proofs shall be sufficient if the clerk listed on the certificate as performing service places the document to be collected by the United States Postal Service. If a party moves on service and the court finds it to be in good cause, the court will then assume the service occurred on the date shown in the mail’s cancellation stamp or postage meter marking, provided the date is more than one day after the date of initial mailing, as stated in the certificate.

This code is used by the court to determine whether a document that was served is valid in a legal action.


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